Category: Achilles tendon

Seven Tips for Picking the Right Gym

Getting into shape

Sticking to your plan to regularly hit the gym can be tough. It’s even tougher if you hate the gym where you work out.

Consciously choosing to endure the sweat and labor involved with getting into shape already takes enough willpower. Don’t make it even harder by having to steel yourself to make your daily trip to a place that blasts crappy music, smells like socks, or has jerks for fellow members.

Working out is a lot easier if you look forward to visiting your gym. Follow these tips for picking the right place to get your fitness on:

  • Visit first – Take the time to visit a gym a few times before becoming a member. See if the trainer will give you a complimentary session so you can get a feel for everything the gym has to offer. If you have a friend who’s a member, see if they can take you there as a guest a few times so you can get a feel for the facility.
  • The right spot – Pick a gym that’s convenient to your home or work. Getting to the gym on a regular basis is a lot easier if it’s not in an out-of-the way spot. Make sure that parking is convenient. Also, if you plan to work out in the evening hours, be sure that the gym is in a safe neighborhood.
  • Explore options – What fitness options does the gym offer? Does it have yoga or MMA-style classes? How often can you work with a trainer? What type of exercise equipment does it have? Are childcare options available? Find a gym with options that appeal to you and your fitness goals.
  • Check reviews – Take a look at the online reviews for the gym you’re considering. A few bad reviews are to be expected anywhere, but if a location has consistently bad reviews, it may be a red flag.
  • Check the amenities – See if the gym you’re considering has convenient access to sports drinks and water, as well as healthy snacks like energy bars. Being able to refuel your body after a strenuous workout really helps.
  • Check prices – Make sure you understand the pricing structure of your gym. Many gyms have low monthly fees, but then stick it to their members with a variety of annual or quarterly fees. To avoid any unpleasant surprises, be sure to get a clear picture of how gym membership will impact your finances.
  • Understand the plan – Many a gym member has been burned by unreasonable gym membership contracts. You’re joining a gym, not selling your soul. Avoid gyms that lock you into long-term commitments, and be sure to understand how you can break your contract in case of a medical emergency or in the event you have to move to another city.

Energy bars

Signing up for a gym is just one step in your path to better fitness. Eating right is another important step. Promax Nutrition provides healthy energy bars and other snacks to help fitness enthusiasts get all-natural protein from vegetarian sources. Check out Promax Nutrition today to see all of the delicious protein bars and other natural, gluten free snacks that will help fuel your body after a workout.

Training with Your Achilles tendon in Mind

Achilles Tendon Wrapped

While we’re training, we constantly have certain things in mind. We know that in order to be in our best shape, we need to get a proper amount of sleep, make sure that we remain hydrated, and take special care with nutrition to get the protein and carbohydrates we need. But there are specific parts of the body that we should be focused on taking special care of. Today we’re going to talk about the Achilles tendon. Did you know that when running or doing any sort of movement which requires a push-off motion, you’re not using your quad muscle, but instead using your ankle and Achilles tendon? That’s a lot of pressure for one tendon. Whether you’re a professional athlete or just getting started with your training, it’s important not to forget the Achilles.

Anatomy of the Achilles tendon

The Achilles tendon is located at the back of your ankle above the heel and is the body’s largest tendon. The tendon itself involves three muscular groups: the gastrocnemius muscle, the soleus muscle, and the medial and lateral heads of each. The gastrocnemius muscle is located above the knee and the soleus is below the knee. This means that the way you care for your knees and calf muscles all contribute to the overall wellness of your Achilles tendon.

How do I care for the Achilles tendon?

We’ve talked before about the importance of stretching and how it relates to your training. Stretching is particularly important when it comes to your Achilles tendon. Because the Achilles is related anatomically to so many muscle groups, it is important to keep your lower body well stretched. This means your quadriceps, your calves, and your ankles. It’s also a good idea to keep your hips, abs, and quadriceps strong so that you can use your strength there to alleviate pressure you’re putting on your Achilles tendon.

How will I know if I’ve hurt my Achilles tendon?

There are a few symptoms you’ll experience if there’s a problem with your Achilles tendon. Look out for the following:

-a snapping or popping noise

-swelling

-tenderness

-pain when rotating the ankle or foot

-stiffness

If I hurt my Achilles tendon, what do I do?

The first thing that’s important to do if you hurt your Achilles tendon is to stop training. Yes, we know that’s hard to hear, but in the long run, it’ll be important that you get the rest and care you need to properly heal so that you can continue training as soon as possible. Make an appointment to see a doctor as soon as you can. In the meantime, focus on anti-inflammatory measures, like icing your Achilles tendon, keeping it elevated, and using compression.

In many cases a doctor will recommend physical therapy, though there are other therapies that can be done to treat problems surrounding your Achilles tendon. One of these therapies is Electric Shock Wave Therapy, which helps to promote the formation of new blood vessels.

Have more questions?

Getting injured, no matter how major or minor the injury is, is a scary thing for an athlete. Here at Promax, we’re here for you. If you have questions about training options you can do that won’t affect an injury, feel free to reach out with questions on our Facebook or Twitter. You can also choose to contact us directly, we’d love to hear from you!

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/guide/achilles-tendon-injury
http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/achilles-tendon-problems-home-treatment
http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-treatment/treating-and-recovering-from-achilles-injury
http://runnersconnect.net/running-training-articles/how-to-strengthen-your-calves-and-achilles-to-prevent-injury/