Category: Summer

6 Summer Workout Safety Tips

Summer Workout

There just isn’t a better time to get out and be active than in the summer. You might have beautiful weather, and you might have blistering heat, but you also have a lot of daylight and an urge to get outside. But even if you’re in the best shape of your life, the change in temperature could spell trouble if you aren’t careful. Your body isn’t used to the summer heat yet, and that can affect your workout, and even your health, if you don’t take some precautions. Summer workout safety doesn’t have to be extreme, but if you follow these tips you can stay safe and get a more effective workout.

  1. Time it right

Most of us have some trouble getting up in the morning, but once the summer heat comes around, you should try to prioritize getting up and working out before the heat really starts getting bad. Otherwise, wait until later in the evening when it begins cooling down. Working out when the sun is beating down and the temperatures are at their highest can negatively affect your workout, as well as make you just plain uncomfortable.

  1. Wear the right clothing

Wearing loose-fitting, light colored clothing can do wonders for keeping you cool when the temperature spikes. Tight fitting workout clothes may have worked well with cooler temperatures, but they can prevent air from circulating over your skin and cooling you down.

  1. Use sunscreen

If you’re going to be working out outdoors, you really should be putting on some protection for your skin. As well as reducing your risk of skin cancer later down the road, avoiding sunburns is a practical measure for your workout. A bad burn can make any movement of the skin painful, and even putting on a shirt can irritate the burned skin. Better to avoid it altogether if you want to stick with your routine.

  1. Stay hydrated

It might seem like a no-brainer, but staying hydrated means drinking more water than you usually do. No need to overdo it, though. Drink water before, during, and after exercising in the heat, and don’t try to push yourself when you’re already feeling thirsty or fatigued.

  1. Get acclimated

It may take up to two weeks for your body to fully acclimate to the heat. Ease up and be satisfied with a shorter or less intense workout. Your body will soon get used to the temperature, but in the meantime there’s no need to push yourself into dangerous territory.

 Don’t forget about the humidity

A higher humidity actually makes hot temperatures more dangerous for outdoor workouts. That’s because it prevents sweat from evaporating off your skin and cooling your body. Check the heat index in your area to get a better idea of how it actually feels outdoors.

Working out in the summer heat can be more taxing than your normal workouts, and you’ll need something to help you recover quickly and get back at it. So pick up a Promax protein bar today, and discover why so many people rely on Promax for their workout nutrition.

Information and Tips for Training in the Summer Heat

Exhausted runner

Training in the outdoors during the hot summer months is more challenging than working out during the cooler spring and fall months. As the heat and humidity increase, your overall performance tends to decrease. This is largely due to the fact that the body, on the physiological level, does not function as well. The body sweats more, which translates to dehydration. In addition, the heart rate is much higher and blood flow is reduced. As a result, less oxygen is getting to the muscles.

Sweating cannot be helped while working out, especially outdoors in summertime. Sweat is the body’s own natural air conditioning system to help cool down the body. The sweat removes excess heat from within the body. As the sweat evaporates, it cools. However, the rate of evaporation is directly related to the humidity levels. Higher humidity means slower evaporation and less cooling.

With sweating also comes dehydration, because the body is losing water, salt, and electrolytes. Further complicating matters is an increase in heart rate. Normally it will increase about four beats per minute when working out at temperatures below 75 degrees Fahrenheit. As the temperature continues to climb, heart rates can increase 10 beats or more per minute, with increases in humidity further contributing to even higher heart rates.

In addition, as sweat is released, the volume of blood flow declines, too. This means there is less blood returning to the heart and lungs to get oxygen and supply that oxygen to your muscles. Since the muscles are getting less oxygen, they cannot produce as much energy, so you will notice a slowdown in your workout routine.

However, exercising outdoors in hot summer days does have its benefits. Mainly, your endurance levels and performance will increase as your body acclimates to working out in this type of environment. Even still, there are several precautions you should take, along with these tips to ensure a safe workout:

  1. Keep hydrated. Drink a few glasses of water before starting your routine, and take along plenty of water. Remember to drink a little water about every fifteen minutes, as well as few more glasses of water afterwards.
  2. Avoid the hottest times of the day. It is best to avoid working out from around 11 a.m. until 5 p.m., as this is when it is hottest. Try to fit your routines in either before or after this time.
  3. Remember to protect your skin. Wear a high SPF rated sunscreen that is waterproof to protect your skin, even on cloudy and overcast days.
  4. Wear light colored, breathable clothing. Light colors reflect heat, and breathable clothing helps keep you cooler.
  5. Replenish lost electrolytes and salt after workouts. Eat sports nutrition bars and drink water infused with electrolytes to restore the proper levels.

Stock up on your favorite nutrition, sports, energy, and workout bars by ordering them direct from Promax Nutrition today, or call (888) 728-8962 for further assistance.

Sports Nutrition Bars

Should You Change Your Workout To Fit The Weather?

Jogging Outside

Depending on where you live, you may already be feeling the effects of the summer heat. If your workout is based outside, you may find yourself wondering if you should change it up to accommodate the coming heat. But does that mean you’re giving in to the weather? Won’t you get the most out of your workout if you’re performing under tougher conditions? Maybe, but if the temperature spikes and you aren’t ready for it, you could actually be hurting your performance. Here’s why you should take some basic steps to change up your workout when the thermometer tops out this summer.

Why make a change?

Even if you’re at the top of your game, a dramatic change in temperature can pose problems in your workout. Working out in a hot environment that you aren’t used to will increase your body’s core temperature. This increase can actually reduce the endurance capacity of your muscles, increase your body’s reliance on carbohydrates for fuel, and compromise aspects of your cardiovascular function.

So what should you do?

You have to give your body time to acclimate to the heat, and once it does, you’ll be able to train harder and more effectively. That doesn’t mean you need to completely change your workout, but there are some easy and effective ways to acclimate your body.

  • Instead of heading inside to run on the treadmill, change your workout times to the morning or evening, when temperatures aren’t as brutal. If you can’t change the time of your workout, reduce your duration or intensity until your body gets used to the heat. You can even try little things like choosing a running route that provides plenty of shade on the sidewalk. Most people should become acclimated to the heat after a week or two of training.
  • Drinking more fluids is also key. Always make sure you’re drinking water before, during and after your training. Drink fluids even when you don’t necessarily feel thirsty, and try a succession of small drinks, rather than a few huge glasses of water.
  • Also remember to take into account the humidity in the area where you’re training. A humid environment keeps sweat from evaporating off your skin, which is actually what cools us down, not the sweating itself. So if you live in an area known for humidity, don’t forget to check the heat index to see if it’s safe for you to train outside at that time.

Like we said before, your training will go smoother if you give your body time to adjust to the heat. Trying to push yourself and keep the same routine when conditions change is only going to disrupt your training, and can even be dangerous.

After any workout, indoors or out, you want to recover and get back to work as quickly as possible. So try a Promax protein bar today. They’ve got all the protein you need to get your body performing at its peak.